we knew not whether we were in heaven or on earth

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me on my way home from class:
oh man i'm gonna get so much work done let me make a to do list and get that shit done quickly and effectively i'm so pumped
me the second i get home:
nah

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vacilandoelmundo:

Time Slice by Richard Silver

The idea behind the “Time Sliced” Project was to photograph iconic world buildings at sunset and capture the changing light from day to night in a single image. Experimenting with a few different kinds of processes I came up with the “Sliced” idea. I decided to Slice time and light showing the progression of the day from left to right.

(via hesperos)

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plavapticica:

languagethings:

wordfully:

imminentmoose:

I was reading the other day that it was believed that using the Proto-Indo-European word for bears (which evolved into the Latin ‘ursus’ and the Greek ‘arktos’) would summon one to wreck your shit, so the Germanic people speaking Old English would use ‘bruin’ or ‘brown one’ as a euphemism. The original word is now completely lost because of it.
Source

this is 100% true story.

in slavic languages, it was considered taboo to say bear as well, so lot’s of them replaced it with a variation of “медведь” : someone who eats honey. 

Ok but magic words are my fave thing about language ever, also unknowable words and Name magic (knowing someone’s name gives you power over them) and also Song as a way of keeping people alive or willing the dead back to life but literally not figuratively ( see lectures on Singing the Rug and also the hero obsession with fame)

plavapticica:

languagethings:

wordfully:

imminentmoose:

I was reading the other day that it was believed that using the Proto-Indo-European word for bears (which evolved into the Latin ‘ursus’ and the Greek ‘arktos’) would summon one to wreck your shit, so the Germanic people speaking Old English would use ‘bruin’ or ‘brown one’ as a euphemism. The original word is now completely lost because of it.

this is 100% true story.

in slavic languages, it was considered taboo to say bear as well, so lot’s of them replaced it with a variation of “медведь” : someone who eats honey. 

Ok but magic words are my fave thing about language ever, also unknowable words and Name magic (knowing someone’s name gives you power over them) and also Song as a way of keeping people alive or willing the dead back to life but literally not figuratively ( see lectures on Singing the Rug and also the hero obsession with fame)

(via penthesileas)

Filed under language